proposal abstract sample

proposal abstract sample

Proposal abstract sample
Abstact writing is a skill of saying as much as possible in as few words as possible (around 150—250 words). The reader of the abstract must understand your project without reading the complet proposal. The structure of the abstract should follow the structure of the whole proposal:
An example of an abstract

To present the essential meaning of the proposal, the abstract should summarize the significance (need) of the work, the hypothesis and major objectives of the project, the procedures to be followed to accomplish the objectives, and the potential impact of the work. Though it appears first, the abstract should be edited last, as a concise summary of the proposal. Length depends on sponsor’s guidelines (from ½ to 2 pages).
Every proposal should have an abstract. The abstract forms the reader’s initial impression of the work, and therefore plays a big role on whether the application is funded. The abstract speaks for the proposal when it is separated from it, provides the reader with his or her first impression of the request, and, by acting as a summary, frequently provides the reader their last impression. Some reviewers read only the abstract, e.g., a foundation board of directors’ member who votes on final funding decisions. Thus it is the most important single element in the proposal.

The Prevalence of Theoretical Behavior Change Components in the Top Breast Cancer Websites to Encourage Detection or Prevention Behaviors and to Solicit Donations
The Role of Src-Homology-3 in the Activation Mechanism of MLK3

References:

http://orsp.umich.edu/research-proposals-abstract-or-summary
http://www.urca.msu.edu/abstract-samples
http://libguides.rutgers.edu/dissertation_writing/samples

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